‘Worst Day of My Life’: Dad, Mom Tell Their Story

In the aftermath of a devastating tornado that destroyed her home and left her family devastated, a new dad and his wife are coming forward with their heartbreaking stories of grief, anger and fear.

The two were among hundreds of residents evacuated from their homes after a tornado ripped through the town of Fannin on the outskirts of Oklahoma City late Wednesday.

They described their first thoughts and feelings about the tornado that caused such devastation.

“I was very scared,” said Brian Lee, who has been a truck driver for eight years.

“My wife was worried about me, my kids.

I think I was a little upset with myself that I didn’t call the emergency number sooner. “

It was a bad day.

I think I was a little upset with myself that I didn’t call the emergency number sooner.

I had no electricity and no water and no phone. “

The worst thing I had to deal with was that I couldn’t leave my house.

I had no electricity and no water and no phone.

I wasn’t sure what was going to happen and I didn�t know what to do.

And I went back to my house and cried.””

I was like, ‘Where am I going to go?’

And I went back to my house and cried.”

The Lee family was evacuated to a motel, where the family was treated for minor injuries and sent to another hotel.

The Lee family’s home was destroyed, but the family still lives in Fannins home.

“My wife said it was like the worst day of my life,” Lee said.

“She said, ‘I wish I could have left it the way I left it.’

She’s the kind of person who always has the right answer, and I just kind of felt like I was trying to be right.

I just didn’t have that energy to go back and do it.”

Lee and his two daughters are expecting a second child in October, and he said he was considering having another child when the storm was over.

“It was devastating,” he said.

The storm left residents in the Fannino area without power and limited access to water and gas.

“If the power went out and people didn’t get to their homes, we could have lost everything,” he told NBC News.

“And we had no power.

We had no water.

There was no running water.”

The tornado left a trail of destruction, including homes that have not been repaired.

Fannina, about 20 miles northeast of Oklahoma, is about an hour from the Oklahoma City metropolitan area.

Residents living in the tornado�s path are in need of help.

A local food bank and other non-emergency services are offering food to residents in need, and emergency services are providing bottled water, bottled meals and other supplies.

The Oklahoma Department of Public Safety has sent help to local governments and agencies that are working with residents, including schools, parks and libraries.

The National Guard is helping coordinate the effort.